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Donkey Kong - Nintendo NES system

Connecting a remote emulator.

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NES gamepad:

NES gamepad


Gamepad control:

 

Player 1: Player 2:
-
-
-
-
A X -
B Z -
SELECT Shift -
START Enter -

Emulator selection:

The following emulators are a­vai­lab­le for this game: NeptunJS (Ja­va­Script), Nesbox (Flash), Ret­ro­Games (JS) and vNES (Java).


Other platforms:

This game can be played also in a versions for Ata­ri 2600, Ata­ri 7800 and DOS.



Game info:
Donkey Kong - box cover
box cover
Game title: Donkey Kong
Console: Nintendo Entertainment System (NES)
Author (released): Nintendo (1981)
Genre: Action, Platform Mode: Multiplayer
Design: Shigeru Miyamoto
Music: Yukio Kaneoka
Game manual: manual.pdf

File size:

982 kB
Download: not available (stream only)

Game size:

24 kB
Recommended emulator: FCEUX

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia:

   Donkey Kong is an arcade game released by Nintendo in 1981. It is an early example of the platform game genre, as the gameplay focuses on maneuvering the main character across a series of platforms while dodging and jumping over obstacles. In the game, Jumpman (since renamed Mario) must rescue a damsel in distress, Lady (now named Pauline), from a giant ape named Donkey Kong (who would later become Cranky Kong). The hero and ape later became two of Nintendo's most popular and recognizable characters. Donkey Kong is one of the most important titles from the Golden Age of Video Arcade Games, and became one of the most popular arcade games of all time.
Donkey Kong (NES version)
Donkey Kong (NES version)

   Following 1980's Space Panic, Donkey Kong is one of the earliest examples of the platform game genre even prior to the term being coined; the U.S. gaming press used climbing game for games with platforms and ladders. As the first platform game to feature jumping, Donkey Kong requires the player to jump between gaps and over obstacles or approaching enemies, setting the template for the future of the genre. With its four unique stages, Donkey Kong is the most complex arcade game of the time, and one of the first arcade games with multiple stages, following games such as 1980's Phoenix and 1981's Gorf and Scramble. 
   In addition to the goal of saving Pauline, the player has a score. Points are awarded for the following: leaping over obstacles; destroying objects with a hammer power-up; collecting items such as hats, parasols, and purses (presumably belonging to Pauline); removing rivets from platforms; and completing each stage according to a steadily decreasing bonus counter. The player starts with three lives with a bonus life awarded at 7,000 points, adjustable via DIP switches. A life is lost when Mario touches Donkey Kong or any enemy object, falls too far, or lets the bonus counter reach zero. The game ends when all lives are lost.
   Each of the four single-screen stages represents 25 meters of the structure Donkey Kong has climbed: 25, 50, 75, and 100 meters. Stage one involves Mario scaling a construction site made of crooked girders and ladders while jumping over or hammering barrels and oil drums tossed by Donkey Kong. Stage two involves climbing a five-story structure of conveyor belts, each of which transport cement pans. The third stage involves the player riding elevators while avoiding bouncing springs. The final stage requires Mario to remove eight rivets from the platforms supporting Donkey Kong; this causes Donkey Kong to fall and the hero to be reunited with Pauline. These four stages combine to form one level.
   After each level, the stages repeat with increased difficulty. For example, Donkey Kong begins to hurl barrels faster and sometimes diagonally, and fireballs speed up. The victory music alternates between levels 1 and 2. The fourth level consists of 5 stages with the final stage at 125 meters. The 22nd level is colloquially known as the kill screen, due to a programming error that kills Mario after a few seconds, effectively ending the game. However, in the Japanese Version 1, the player can complete all the stages up to 100 meters. 100 meters in level 22 is the true kill screen of this version.

More details about this game can be found on Wikipedia.org.

For fans and collectors:
Find this game on video server YouTube.com or Vimeo.com.
Buy original game or NES console on Amazon.com or eBay.com.

Find digital download of this game on GOG or Steam.

 
Game controls:

The NES version of Donkey Kong was originally controlled via the NES controller with a cross-shaped joypad and two action buttons. The basic description of game controls is summarized in the table below. Detailed description of how to play this game can be found a in the attached game manual. Please note that individual gamepad buttons are emulated by different keys on your PC keyboard depending on the settings of your online emulator (see the table next to the game).

Use the D-pad to control Mario's movement. Pushing left or right makes Mario run, while pushing up or down makes Mario climb or descend ladders.

Pushing A button makes Mario jump. If the button is pushed alone, Mario will jump straight up, but if the left or right button is pressed at the same time, Mario will perform a running jump in either direction.

Not used.

Press SELECT on the title screen menu to choose between a one or two player game.

Press START on the title screen to start the game. Press START during play to pause. Press again to resume play.

 
Videogame Console:

This ver­sion of Donkey Kong was de­sig­ned for the Nin­ten­do En­ter­tai­nment Sys­tem (NES), which was an eight-bit vi­deo ga­me con­so­le ma­nu­fac­tu­red by Nin­ten­do in the years 1983 - 2003. In that time, it was the best-sel­ling vi­deo ga­me con­so­le for which mo­re than 700 li­cen­sed ga­mes and a num­ber of non-li­cen­sed ga­mes we­re cre­a­ted. World­wi­de, ap­pro­xi­ma­te­ly 62 mil­lion units of this con­so­le we­re sold at ap­pro­xi­ma­te­ly pri­ce $ 100 per unit. Mo­re in­for­ma­ti­on about the NES con­so­le can be found here.


Recommended Game Controllers:

You can control this game easily by using the keyboard of your PC (see the table next to the game). However, for maximum gaming enjoyment, we strongly recommend using a USB gamepad that you simply plug into the USB port of your computer. If you do not have a gamepad, you can buy one of these NES controllers:

Available online emulators:

6 different online emulators are available for Donkey Kong. These emulators differ not only in the technology they use to emulate old games, but also in support of various game controllers, multiplayer mode, mobile phone touchscreen, emulation speed, absence or presence of embedded ads and in many other parameters. For maximum gaming enjoyment, it's important to choose the right emulator, because on each PC and in different Internet browsers, the individual emulators behave differently. The basic features of each emulator available for this game Donkey Kong are summarized in the following table:
 

Emulator Technology Multiplayer USB gamepad Touchscreen Without ads
NeptunJS JavaScript YES YES NO NO
NesBox Flash NO YES NO YES
RetroGames.cc JavaScript YES YES YES NO
EmulatorJS JavaScript YES YES YES NO
vNES Java applet YES NO NO YES
Emulatrix JavaScript NO NO NO YES

Similar games:
Donkey Kong Donkey Kong Jr. Donkey Kong 3 CHAMP Kong King Kong
Donkey Kong Donkey Kong Jr. Donkey Kong 3 CHAMP Kong King Kong

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